FORUM
ISSN 0963-8253


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Volume 60 Number 2 2018

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CONTENTS [click on author's name for abstract and full text]

 

Building a National Education Service

Howard Stevenson. Editorial. Building the Movement for a National Education Service, pages 155-157 FREE ACCESS VIEW FULL TEXT http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.155

Eddie Playfair. The Promise of a National Education Service, pages 159-169

Michael Bassey. Why a National Education Council is Needed, pages 171-177

Terry Wrigley. For the Many: a curriculum for social justice, pages 179-195

Melissa Benn. Whose System Is it Anyway?, pages 197-199

Richard Hatcher. The Realistic Possibility of a Labour Government Led by Jeremy Corbyn Means We Could Get Rid of Academies for Good, pages 201-216

Andrew Allen & Nigel Gann. Embedding Democratic Engagement in School Leadership: comprehensive schooling structures in an academised system, pages 217-228

Martin Allen & Patrick Ainley. Let’s Not Reinvent the Vocational Route: a comment on Labour’s proposals for 16-plus, pages 229-237

Howard Stevenson. A New Deal for the Teaching Profession, pages 239-243

Carl Parsons. The Continuing School Exclusion Scandal in England, pages 245-254

Colin Richards. Remembering Plowden, pages 255-257

BOOK REVIEW
Higher Education and Social Inequalities, University Admissions, Experiences and Outcomes (Richard Waller, Nicola Ingram & Michael R.M. Ward), reviewed by Patrick Ainley, pages 259-263 VIEW FULL TEXT http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.259


 

The Promise of a National Education Service

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.159

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The proposed creation of a National Education Service (NES) for England offers us the possibility of a decisive break from the market paradigm, where education is seen as a commodity in mainly economic terms and where individual and institutional competition are regarded as the drivers of improvement. Is the advocacy of an NES by the Labour Party a historic opportunity for English education, and what might the benefits and challenges of implementing such a proposal be?

 

 

Why a National Education Council is Needed

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.171

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This article provides a historical overview of how education policy has become increasingly centralised in recent years, and most dramatically under Conservative governments which have proclaimed most loudly about decentralisation and autonomy while enacting policies with the polar-opposite effect. It makes the case for the creation of a National Education Council to drive education policy in the future, whereby professional opinion is privileged and a range of views from politics and civil society are given expression,

 

For the Many: a curriculum for social justice

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.179

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In recent years educational preoccupations have largely focused on ‘teaching and learning’, often drawing on deficit models of teaching and encouraging myths about ‘poor teachers’ and ‘bad teaching’. Debate about the curriculum has been discouraged – but this has not stopped it being ‘reformed’, often in profoundly reactionary ways. This article analyses developments in the English school curriculum and argues that Labour’s proposed National Education Service offers an opportunity to consider what a genuinely socially just curriculum might look like.

 

Whose System Is it Anyway?

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.197

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This adapted abstract from Melissa Benn’s new book, Life Lessons: the case for a National Education Service (Verso), argues for a fundamental shift in the direction of schools policy in England which rejects US-style market solutions and embraces more community-based forms of accountability.

 

The Realistic Possibility of a Labour Government Led by Jeremy Corbyn Means We Could Get Rid of Academies for Good

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.201

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A National Education Service has to fix the multiple problems created by a fragmented and fractured system which has been completely undermined by academisation. This article argues there can be no ambivalence about bringing academy schools back into a local authority system, but that a future Labour government must also reinvigorate what democratic participation and accountability mean in a local government model.

 

Embedding Democratic Engagement in School Leadership: comprehensive schooling structures in an academised system

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.217

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This article describes how a gaping democratic deficit has emerged in the English schools system as both local authorities and school governing bodies have been degraded by academisation. In arguing that a comprehensive school can only be truly comprehensive if it is based on democratic principles, the authors make the case for re-establishing democracy in state education by developing democratic governance structures at school level, and nesting these in a system of Local Education Boards.

 

Let’s Not Reinvent the Vocational Route: a comment on Labour’s proposals for 16-plus

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.229

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A National Education Service should be genuinely cradle to grave. This article focuses on the key area, often neglected, of 16-plus education and highlights the need for substantial public investment using the lessons of past experiences to build on the principle of ‘a good general education for all’ at 16-19.

 

A New Deal for the Teaching Profession

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.239

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The crisis in teacher supply points to fundamental problems in the way teachers in England experience their work. In this contribution to debates about a National Education Service (NES) the author argues that a Labour government must be prepared to radically rethink how it engages with the teaching profession. The challenge is to shift from a compliance culture to one in which education workers become central to building the movement on which the NES will be based.

 

The Continuing School Exclusion Scandal in England

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.245

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The deregulated and marketised education system is failing large numbers of the most vulnerable children in society, with system ‘gaming’ often the motivation behind school exclusions. This article sets out the multiple ways in which students can find themselves outside the formal school system, and identifies several of the systemic pressures that drive the statistics provided.

 

Remembering Plowden

http://doi.org/10.15730/forum.2018.60.2.255

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In 2017 the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of the much-misunderstood and maligned Plowden Report went unnoticed – a pity for those sharing progressive values, needed much more now than in the 1960s. In this article the author argues that the spirit of the report and its underlying values need restating in the current climate.

 

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