FORUM
ISSN 0963-8253


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Volume 54 Number 1 2012

Archive

CONTENTS [click on author's name for abstract and full text]

 

WHAT IS THE WAY FORWARD?

Clyde Chitty. Editorial. What is the Way Forward?, pages 3‑4 http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.3 VIEW FULL TEXT

Caught in the (Education) Act: tackling Michael Gove’s education revolution. Report on 19th November 2011 Conference, pages 5‑12

Clyde Chitty. A Divided Education System, pages 13‑15

Melissa Benn. Putting the Alternative Case: a twenty-first-century vision for England’s schools, pages 17‑21

Stephen Ball. Show Me the Money! Neoliberalism at Work in Education, pages 23‑28

Richard Hatcher. Gove’s Offensive and the Failure of Labour’s Response, pages 29‑35

Terry Parkin. Do We Need a Middle Tier in Education?, pages 37‑40

Bernard Barker. Comprehensive Schools and the Future, pages 41‑43

Tim Brighouse. Decline and Fall: are state schools and universities on the point of collapse?, pages 45‑56

Susan Hallam. Streaming and Setting in UK Primary Schools: evidence from the Millennium Cohort Study, pages 57‑63

Brian Matthews. The Labour Party and the Need for Change: values, education and emotional literacy/intelligence, pages 65‑71

Clive Griggs. Privatisation in Education: further reflections, pages 73‑90 http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.73 VIEW FULL TEXT

Lottie Hoare. Margaret Miles: the educational journey of a comprehensive school campaigner, pages 91‑102

Paul Dash. Secondary Modern School Education: an essay in subjugation and repression, pages 103‑111

Paul Pettinger. The Evidence Base on the Effects of Policy and Practice in Faith Schools, pages 113‑120

Theo Creber. The Intersection of Community, Culture and Learning Processes within the Setting of a Chinese Complementary School, pages 121‑134

BOOK REVIEWS
School Wars: the battle for Britain’s education (Melissa Benn), reviewed by Clive Griggs, Bernard Barker and Derek Gillard, pages 135‑152
Assessing Children’s Learning
(Mary Jane Drummond), reviewed by Michael Armstrong, pages 153‑158
Education for the Inevitable: schooling when the oil runs out
(Michael Bassey) reviewed by Colin Richards, pages 158‑159
Politics and the Primary Teacher
(Peter Cunningham), reviewed by Derek Gillard, pages 159‑170
To Miss With Love
(Katharine Birbalsingh), reviewed by Patrick Yarker, pages 170‑176 http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.135 VIEW FULL TEXT

 


 

Caught in the (Education) Act: tackling Michael Gove’s education revolution

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.5

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A number of significant campaigning organisations and education trades unions – the Anti-Academies Alliance, CASE, Comprehensive Future, Forum, ISCG and the Socialist Educational Association, along with ASCL, ATL, NASUWT and NUT – staged a conference in London on 19 November 2011, with the title ‘Caught in the (Education) Act: tackling Michael Gove’s education revolution’. This is an edited version of the Report of that conference.

 

A Divided Education System

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.13

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This is a slightly amended version of the talk with which Clyde Chitty opened the ‘Caught in the Act’ Conference on 19 November 2011.

 

Putting the Alternative Case: a twenty-first-century vision for England’s schools

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.17

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This is an amended version of a talk given by Melissa Benn to the ‘Caught in the Act’ Conference on 19 November 2011.

 

Show Me the Money! Neoliberalism at Work in Education

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.23

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Neoliberalism is often addressed by commentators and critics as a set of ideas or a doctrine. This article considers neoliberalism as a set of financial practices and exchanges – as about money and profit – and goes on to suggest that as practitioners, researchers, activists we need to understand and engage with that logic and its mechanisms. Examples are given of the role of money in all aspects of education policy and education reform.

 

Gove’s Offensive and the Failure of Labour’s Response

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.29

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In this article the author examines the response of the Labour leadership to the Conservative-led Government’s policies for restructuring and re-agenting the school system. His focus is on the role of local authorities and local democracy. He identifies two contradictory dynamics in Labour’s current thinking. One promises to enhance local democracy and community empowerment. The other, dominant, accepts the new landscape of academies and free schools and advocates new powers for local school commissioners and elected mayors in the school system. Neither, however, offer a vision of enhanced local democratic accountability through the reinvigoration of local authorities.

 

Do We Need a Middle Tier in Education?

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.37

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The direction of the UK Government’s policy is to remove schools from local authority control, and replace that relationship with private sponsors, undermining their ability, or indeed inclination, to deliver on the ‘Every Child Matters’ agenda, among many others. The author argues that local authorities have much to give and where they have focused on building effective partnerships, communities of schools can be effective in accepting a much wider range of local responsibilities, from standards to special educational needs. This could be achieved through an enhanced duty to cooperate placed on schools by central government and this should form the basis of any future reform to ensure local schools are once again placed under the control of the communities they serve.

 

Comprehensive Schools and the Future

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.41

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This article argues that comprehensive reorganisation was not a one-off policy reform but a complex, bottom-up campaign for equity and fairness in education, with varied consequences and outcomes. Recent battles over student fees, free schools and academies show that the quest for democratic education does not lead to a permanent achievement but to perpetual struggle with privileged groups who feel themselves threatened by social justice.

 

Decline and Fall: are state schools and universities on the point of collapse?

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.55

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This contribution is an edited version of the ‘Alumni Lecture’ organised by the Department of Education of the University of Oxford at Lady Margaret Hall on 15th September 2011. The article reviews the drift towards the centralisation of power in the way the schooling system is run, the conflict between a desire for equity in education and the promotion of the influence of market forces. It reviews standards of outcome in schools over time with a brief look at similar tensions in the influences on universities and ends with a call for a review of the distribution of powers among central government, local government and the schools.

 

Streaming and Setting in UK Primary Schools: evidence from the Millennium Cohort Study

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.57

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This article provides a brief historical perspective on structured ability grouping, a summary of recent research on streaming and setting amongst seven-year-olds from the Millennium Cohort Study, and considers some of the implications of what appears to be an increase in structured ability grouping in the primary school.

 

The Labour Party and the Need for Change: values, education and emotional literacy/intelligence

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.65

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The author argues that when the Labour Party has analysed its values emotional development has been neglected. He shows the importance of emotional literacy and uses education as a vehicle to show how Labour when in power reinforced right-wing ideology. Ways of changing education policy are indicated. It is hoped that this article will promote a lively discussion.

 

Margaret Miles: the educational journey of a comprehensive school campaigner

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.91

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As a former comprehensive school pupil herself, the author wanted to know more about the women who had pioneered comprehensive schools in England. Therefore, she chose the headmistress and comprehensive school campaigner Dame Margaret Miles (1911‑1994) as the subject of a dissertation for her History of Education MA at the Institute of Education, University of London. This article attempts to rebuild the story of Margaret Miles’ networks of influence from 1911‑1955 and explains how she gathered ideas that she hoped to transplant into the comprehensive school system after 1955. The author then move on to examine how seeds of doubt about Miles’ particular vision and comprehensive education in general were introduced to a nervous public in documentary film between 1955 and 1963.

 

Secondary Modern School Education: an essay in subjugation and repression

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.103

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This article reflects on the inequity of secondary modern school education. In doing so it draws heavily on the experience of the author while highlighting inputs from others who failed the 11+ examination and were banished to such schools. The article argues that selection undermines the self-esteem of secondary modern school pupils and places them at a life-long disadvantage relative to successful candidates of selection. He discusses some of his experiences in greater detail in his 2002 autobiography Foreday Morning.

 

The Evidence Base on the Effects of Policy and Practice in Faith Schools

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.113

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This article analyses some of the common assertions made in the public debate about the merits and disadvantages of faith schools and tests them against actual research findings. It argues that there is a growing body of evidence showing that current policy and practice in faith schools creates social division and that faith schools need to do more to respect the rights and beliefs of staff, pupils and their families.

 

The Intersection of Community, Culture and Learning Processes within the Setting of a Chinese Complementary School

http://doi.org/10.2304/forum.2012.54.1.121

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This article is based on a research assignment submitted for the PGCE Course at Goldsmiths College, University of London. It looks at a Chinese community school and considers the experiences of participating families and explores how the ethos and purpose of the school relate to the practices, activities and representations that occur within its communal space. Since writing this article the school has successfully relocated to new premises at another East London secondary school.

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