FORUM
ISSN 0963-8253


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Volume 50 Number 3 2008

Archive

CONTENTS [click on author's name for abstract and full text]

 

Celebrating Fifty Years of FORUM

Clyde Chitty. Editorial. The Story of FORUM, 1958‑2008, pages 281‑293 VIEW FULL TEXT doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.281
Editorials from the first two issues of FORUM, pages 295‑297 VIEW FULL TEXT doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.295
Messages from Tony Benn and Margaret Tulloch, page 299 VIEW FULL TEXT doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.299

SYMPOSIUM
Ros Bayley, Tony Breslin, Sheila Dainton, John Dunford, Nansi Ellis, Antony Lishak, Maggie McLean, Melian Mansfield, Colin Richards & Fleur Young. Reflections on the 1988 Education Reform Act, pages 301‑314

Roger Seckington
. A Rural Comprehensive Forty Years On, pages 315‑319
Liz Thomson. Revisiting Teachers as Learners, pages 321‑327
Annabelle Dixon. Her last two Editorials for FORUM, pages 329‑332
Brian Simon. An extract from Bending the Rules, pages 333‑335
_______________________________________________

Denis Lawton
. The National Curriculum Since 1988: panacea or poisoned chalice?, pages 337‑341
Clyde Chitty. The UK National Curriculum: an historical perspective, pages 343‑348
Peter Wilby. Education and Social Mobility, pages 349‑352
John Elliott. The Birth of a School Academy in North Norwich: a case study, pages 353‑366
Patrick Yarker. Lifting the Lid and Mucking about with Minds: the example and challenge of Room 13, pages 367‑376
David Halpin. In Praise of Wasting Time in Education: some lessons from the Romantics, pages 377‑381
Natacha Kennedy. Transgendered Children in Schools; a critical review of Homophobic Bullying: safe to learn – embedding anti-bullying work in schools, pages 383‑396
David Kitchener. Inclusion or Selection? The 14+ Education and Training Reforms, pages 397‑408
Jeff Serf. Global Learning in a Changing and Unpredictable World, pages 411‑418

NEWS REPORT VIEW FULL TEXT doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.421
Anti-academy Group in Barrow, pages 421‑422

BOOK REVIEW VIEW FULL TEXT doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.423
The Education Debate (Stephen J. Ball), reviewed by Clive Griggs, pages 423‑428


 

Symposium. Reflections on the 1988 Education Reform Act

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.301

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For this 50th anniversary edition, FORUM invited a group of readers, many of whom were teaching 20 years ago, to reflect on the implications of the 1988 Education Reform Act from a personal viewpoint. The resulting symposium brings together a rich, unique and often candid collection of thoughts and reflections written from a wide variety of perspectives.

 

A Rural Comprehensive Forty Years On

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.315

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Drawing on a lengthy link with a particular school together with wider experience of work in the secondary sector, an argument is made for supporting all-ability, neighbourhood schools with strong community links. Rather than the endless centrally imposed tinkering as each new governmental regime produces its’ latest ‘big idea’; it is important to recognise that the development of schools should be a steady, organic process. Clearly given the great differences in catchment areas support must reflect need but the principle of neighbourhood community schooling should be paramount.

 

Revisiting Teachers as Learners

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.321

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This article revisits the concept of teachers as learners within the context of radical changes that have taken place within the education system in England over the past 25 years. The concept of professional courage is discussed and examined in relation to questions and issues raised by Paulo Freire in a series of letters to teachers (1997). Further questions are raised about professional courage in order to provide a basis for a dialogue concerning this critical yet unremarked characteristic of outstanding teachers and learners.

 

Her last two Editorials for FORUM

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.329

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No abstract available

 

An extract from Bending the Rules

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.333

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No abstract available

 

The National Curriculum Since 1988: panacea or poisoned chalice?

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.337

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No abstract available

 

The UK National Curriculum: an historical perspective

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.343

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No abstract available

 

Education and Social Mobility

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.349

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No abstract available

 

The Birth of a School Academy in North Norwich: a case study

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.353

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This article raises the question, ‘Is the rapid expansion of the school Academies programme consistent with the Government’s policy of enabling socially disadvantaged local communities to participate in making decisions that shape the quality of their lives?’

 

Lifting the Lid and Mucking about with Minds: the example and challenge of Room 13

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.367

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Nicholas Serota calls Room 13 ‘the most important model for artistic teaching in school that we have in the UK.’ This article describes and considers aspects of the Room 13 initiative. Begun more than a decade ago in Scotland and now spreading internationally, Room 13 treats pupils as artists and business-people. By working alongside adult professional artists-in-residence, pupils grow as artists and improve their visual literacy while taking charge of all aspects of the Room’s management and devising ways to meet its running-costs. Impelled by pupils, Room 13 provides a venue where flourish vital elements of education which current state policy represses or neglects.

 

In Praise of Wasting Time in Education: some lessons from the Romantics

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.377

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Far too much curriculum time in primary schools is overly regulated and assessment driven, with the result that many children attending them are either bored or made to feel anxious. The antidote to this tendency is for teachers to rediscover the value of deregulated (‘wasted’) curriculum time via a renewed commitment to the value of play, fostered by an initial acquaintance with Romantic conceptions of childhood.

 

Transgendered Children in Schools: a critical review of Homophobic Bullying: safe to learn – embedding anti-bullying work in schools

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.383

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The author argues that the interests of transgendered children are being ignored by the Department for Children, Schools and Families and that the publication of guidance on homophobic bullying only serves to highlight deficiencies in the way these children are excluded within the education system.

 

Inclusion or Selection? The 14+ Education and Training Reforms

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.397

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This article provides a chronologically presented overview of policy reforms designed to enhance skill levels via education and training for school-age learners attending post-compulsory education institutions. It is argued that the catalyst for the creation of vocational diplomas is economic rather than educationally based, arising from the Government’s perception of the need to improve productivity and flexibility within the United Kingdom workforce. Consideration is given as to whether the reforms enhance inclusive practice or represent a divisive curriculum, young people being partially excluded from the National Curriculum to study vocational diplomas, and invites comment as to whether this represents a covert return to a selective grammar/secondary modern school model. Arrangements for information sharing between schools and colleges presently delivering vocational qualifications and the support available for young special educational needs learners is investigated via a small-scale study of 15 further education colleges and found to be largely inadequate. Further education lecturing staff attitudes suggest they are largely positive about the possibilities the new arrangements can bring to young people’s lives but are concerned as to the lack of staff development they have received.

 

Global Learning in a Changing and Unpredictable World

doi:10.2304/forum.2008.50.3.411

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This article asserts that the changing nature of present-day society has significant implications for education. However, it questions the extent to which the current educational ‘diet’ provided to the majority of young learners is fit for purpose, i.e. how far it is preparing them to survive and thrive in, and contribute to, an increasingly globalised society. The article explores some of the features of a fit for purpose education and the possibility that the domination of the curriculum by core subject areas or core skills and the resulting marginalisation of other essential elements may not be meeting the educational needs of young people who, after all, will be living in a society that many of us can barely envisage. Future citizens will require, and have a right to, Global Learning – an educational experience that is fit for purpose.

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