E-Learning and Digital Media
ISSN 2042-7530


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Volume 5 Number 4 2008

Archive

CONTENTS [click on author's name for abstract and full text]

 

Erik Jacobson. Learning and Collaborating in the Adult Literacy Education Wiki, pages 370‑383
Elizabeth Murphy & Maria Rodriguez Manzanares. High School Teachers’ beliefs about Learner-Centred E-learning, pages 384‑395
Ivan Alex Games. Three Dialogs: a framework for the analysis and assessment of twenty-first-century literacy practices, and its use within the context of game design within Gamestar Mechanic, pages 396‑417
Salah Al-Fadhli. Students’ Perceptions of E-learning in Arab Society: Kuwait University as case study, pages 418‑428
Donna DeGennaro. The Dialectics Informing Identity in an Urban Youth Digital Storytelling Workshop, pages 429‑444
Francis Bangou & Monica Waterhouse. On ‘Becoming’ Technologically Literate: a multiple literacies theory perspective, pages 445‑456
Barbara Guzzetti. Identities in Online Communities: a young woman’s critique of cyberculture, pages 457‑474
Deryn Graham. A Cooperative Work Framework for E-learning, pages 475‑484
Soly Mathew Biju. Model-based Software Testing for Object Oriented Software, pages 485‑491

POLICY RESEARCH NOTE
Miwa Takeuchi. Access to Creativity: position of technology in the Ontario curriculum for English language learners, pages 492‑496

BOOK REVIEWS doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.497 VIEW FULL TEXT
Multimodal Pedagogies in Diverse Classrooms: representation, rights and resources (Pippa Stein), reviewed by Damiana Gibbons & Alecia Magnifico, pages 497‑500
The Digital Pencil: one-to-one computing for children (Jing Lei, Paul F. Conway & Yong Zhao), reviewed by Eduardo S. Junqueira, pages 500‑502
The Second Life Herald: the virtual tabloid that witnessed the dawn of the metaverse (Peter Ludlow & Mark Wallace), reviewed by Laura Nicosia, pages 502‑504
The Media and International Communication (Barbara Lewandowska-Tomaszczyk, Tomasz Pludowski & Dolores Valencia Tanno, Eds), reviewed by Michael Wagner, pages 505‑507

GAME REVIEW doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.508 VIEW FULL TEXT
The Player Matters: a review of Ninja Gaiden Dragon Sword, reviewed by Mark Chen, pages 508‑512

E-REVIEW LINKS doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.513 VIEW FULL TEXT
Michele Knobel, pages 513‑515




Learning and Collaborating in the Adult Literacy Education Wiki

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.370

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This article presents the results of a mixed-methods study of the Adult Literacy Education Wiki. Two research questions framed the study: (1) What do participants report they have learned by contributing to the wiki? and (2) What is the nature of participation and collaboration in the wiki? A key finding of the study is that the wiki does not achieve the levels of participation and collaboration that its founders hope for, and that contributors’ own perspectives on literacy may be a contributing factor. The article includes suggestions for ways wiki organizers can address the issue of limited participation.

 

High School Teachers’ Beliefs about Learner-Centred E-learning

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.384

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This article reports on a study conducted to gain insight into teachers’ beliefs about e-learning. Data collection relied on discussions conducted with 16 teachers from six high schools in two adjacent municipalities of one Canadian province. Data collection and analysis were guided by a framework of research-validated, learner-centred principles. Teachers’ beliefs portrayed learners as digital natives who actively consume information and knowledge, engage emotionally with technology, and devote themselves to it. Beliefs about teaching referred to teachers as guides and mediators in the knowledge process who can give creative control of the technology, engage learners, and promote higher-order thinking skills. Beliefs about the Internet highlighted its potential to provide unlimited, authentic, purposeful, relevant, participatory, and individualized learning that can take place outside the classroom.

 

Three Dialogs: a framework for the analysis and assessment of twenty-first-century literacy practices, and its use in the context of game design within Gamestar Mechanic

IVAN ALEX GAMES University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.396

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This article discusses a framework for the analysis and assessment of twenty-first-century language and literacy practices in game and design-based contexts. It presents the framework in the context of game design within Gamestar Mechanic, an innovative game-based learning environment where children learn the Discourse of game design. It identifies three dialogic interactions (the material, the ideal player and the real player dialog) that a student must participate in in order to effectively learn the meaning production and interpretation practices germane to good game designs. These dialogs provide the syntactic, semantic and pragmatic components necessary for students to gain fluency in the game designer Discourse. The article illustrates the framework in practice by analyzing two language samples collected in an after-school game design workshop structured around Gamestar Mechanic. Its implications for the research and assessment of game-based learning environments are discussed.

 

Students’ Perceptions of E-learning in Arab Society: Kuwait University as a case study

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.418

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For generations, the primary educational delivery model for university faculty members was essentially the traditional lecture. Due to revolutionary changes in information and communication technologies, knowledge delivery modules have been changed to include e-learning (education access through the Internet). The growth of the use of the Internet has contributed to various types of e-learning in tertiary institutions. E-learning is considered as being a new trend in education in general, and in higher education in particular. The success of this new model depends on the perception of faculty members and students in the educational institution. This article examines the factors that might affect student perception of e-learning courses at Kuwait University as a representative of an Arab society.

 

The Dialectics Informing Identity in an Urban Youth Digital Storytelling Workshop

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.429

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This article examines an after-school program entitled Silk City Media Workshop. Briefly, the workshop engages youth in digital storytelling as a means of enhancing both their technology and literacy skills. Transcending these goals, this workshop also provides opportunities for youth to reveal multiple aspects of their unfolding identities as well as the employment of their agency in the process. The article draws on aspects of cultural sociology and concepts of identity and agency to explore one student’s digital story. The study of this student’s digital story suggests how it both reveals and embodies her identity and agency. Analysis illuminates connections to her histories and interactions between herself and others. Examining the digital story through the explicated framework assists educators in understanding the ways in which students identify themselves and how those identities relate to a set of organized actions that form and re-form over lifetimes, and through collective histories.

 

On ‘Becoming’ Technologically Literate: a multiple literacies theory perspective

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.445

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This article uses a multiple literacies theory framework to explore the processes of ‘becoming’ technologically literate through a year-long ethnographic study of two Master of Education pre-service second language teachers, a Latina woman and an African American woman, who learned how to use computer technology to teach Spanish at a large Midwestern university. The case studies of these two women are analyzed to gain insights into how teacher education programs can support racial minority pre-service teachers in ‘becoming’ technologically literate. First, the authors provide an overview of the multiple literacies theory developed by Masny. Second, the stories of the two pre-service teachers are presented. Finally, curricular and pedagogical recommendations for second language education Master of Education programs are provided.

 

Identities in Online Communities: a young woman’s critique of cyberculture

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.457

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Cyberculture has been more celebrated as establishing sites of possibilities than critiqued as a source of limitations for identity representation. Few researchers have explored through in situ interviews and their own online participation how electronic forums may actually prevent young women’s representations of themselves in cyberspace. Hence, this inquiry was conducted to answer the question of how cyberculture might impede a young woman’s ability to position herself socially in virtual communities. This query was addressed by a case study of a young woman as she navigated cybersites for identity representation in cybercommunities. Through interviews and examinations of the archives of popular cybersites, this article illustrates how sexists, misogynists and trolls marginalized females’ participation in cyberculture through rhetorical strategies and graphic representations. Findings from this study provide insight into the kinds of social interactions in online spaces that may influence females’ academic participation in both offline and online spaces, and offer implications for shifting gendered power relations.

 

A Cooperative Work Framework for E-learning

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.475

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This article describes the evolution of the development of a framework for e-learning to reconsider e-learning in relation to the cooperative work framework, identifying critical weaknesses in the fundamental nature of e-learning and its consequent propensity for failure.

 

Model-Based Software Testing for Object-oriented Software

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.485

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Model-based testing is one of the best solutions for testing object-oriented software. It has a better test coverage than other testing styles. Model-based testing takes into consideration behavioural aspects of a class, which are usually unchecked in other testing methods. An increase in the complexity of software has forced the software industry to look into other reliable models of software testing like model-based testing. This article provides an introduction to various existing methods of testing and compares them with model-based testing.

 

Access to Creativity: position of technology in the Ontario curriculum for English language learners

doi:10.2304/elea.2008.5.4.492

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In this policy research note, the author examines how Ontario curriculum documents for English language learners (ELLs) address information and communication technology (ICT). Upon analysis, three characteristics were identified, as follows: the superiority of standardized English, technology as an ambiguous tool, and under-representation of students’ home literacy practices. ICT in the curriculum for ELLs was, at best, described as a tool for English language acquisition or for functional computer literacy. By examining these characteristics from the perspective of critical theory, ELLs still have difficulty in gaining access to creative uses of ICT. Consequently, the current state of the curriculum will result in sustaining or increasing the literacy divide between ELLs and non-ELLs.

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